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ULTRASOUND

What is an ultrasound?

 

Ultrasound, also referred to as sonography, is an imaging test that uses high-frequency sound waves to capture still or live images of the human body.  An ultrasound can visualize organs, vessels, and soft tissues without radiation.  Ultrasound is frequently used to evaluate the kidneys, bladder, liver, gallbladder, ovaries, uterus, pancreas, spleen, thyroid, testicles, carotid arteries, and other arteries and veins.   Since ultrasound does not use radiation, it is the preferred method to image the fetus during pregnancy.

How do I prepare for my ultrasound?

 

If you are having an abdominal or gallbladder ultrasound, it is advised that you fast for at least eight hours before your exam.  Medications can be taken as usual, unless otherwise directed by your doctor.  For a bladder or pelvic ultrasound, it is necessary to drink water prior to your exam in order to fill your bladder.  This allows the technologist to have a sonographic "window" to better visualize these organs.

What can I expect during my ultrasound exam?

 

For the exam, you will be lying down on a table with a section of your body exposed for the test.  The ultrasound technologist, also called a sonographer, will apply warm ultrasound gel to your skin.  This gel helps with the transmission of sound waves and allows the transducer, or ultrasound probe, to smoothly glide against your skin.  Sound waves are sent through your body and echoes are reflected back into a computer, forming an ultrasound image.  Ultrasound waves are unable to be heard by the human ear.  You may need to change positions during the exam depending on what body part is being imaged.  Most ultrasounds take approximately thirty minutes.  You can resume normal activities after having an ultrasound.  After your ultrasound, your images will be reviewed and reported on by a radiologist, and the results will be sent to your doctor.

Ultrasound, also referred to as sonography, is an imaging test that uses high-frequency sound waves to capture still or live images of the human body.  An ultrasound can visualize organs, vessels, and soft tissues without radiation.  Ultrasound is frequently used to evaluate the kidneys, bladder, liver, gallbladder, ovaries, uterus, pancreas, spleen, thyroid, testicles, carotid arteries, and other arteries and veins.   Since ultrasound does not use radiation, it is the preferred method to image the fetus during pregnancy.